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County Line ‘Pitmaster’ Classes Resume This Week


Garrett Stephens

Garrett Stephens

If Smoke-Grilled, French-Cut Pork Chops, cooked expertly on your own grill sounds like something you need to master, here’s your chance.

As the mild, barbecue-friendly weather moves in, Garrett Stephens and the County Line barbecue team resumes its popular “Pitmaster Cooking Classes” on Friday, April 19 at The County Line on IH-10 West in the Colonnade area.
Class participants will have dinner, which is a full serving of each of three courses, as Stephens demonstrates how to prepare each dish. Guests can ask questions as he cooks, plus everyone will receive a recipe book with space to take their own notes. Pedernales Brewing Company, Rebecca Creek Fine Texas Spirit Whiskey and Enchanted Rock Vodka are the event co-sponsors.
A cocktail reception featuring Enchanted Rock vodka and Rebecca Creek whiskey with house-made ginger ale libations and appetizers begins at 7 p.m.;  the class/dinner begins at 7:30 p.m.
The cost, per person, is $50, not including tax or tip. The class will be held outside on the restaurant’s shaded patio; in case of rain, the class will be moved inside. To make a reservation, contact the restaurant at 210.641.1998 or garretts@countyline.com
County Line pork chop photoThe Menu:
·        First Course: Grilled Radicchio Salad with Fresh Peppers, Carrots, Shaved Parmesan, Meyer Lemon Vinaigrette
·        Main Course: Smoke-Grilled, French-Cut Pork Chop with Herbed Butter, served with Grilled Sweet Potato Steak Fries and Grilled Brussels Sprouts with Balsamic Reduction and Meyer Lemon
·        Dessert: Grilled Buttermilk Bread Pudding with Rhubarb-Pear Compote
·        Beer pairing for each course with craft beers from Fredericksburg-based Pedernales Brewing Company.

 

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Learn How to Create a Thanksgiving Feast on the Grill at County Line Cooking Class


Lemon Salt-Rubbed Smoked Turkey

Garrett Stephens and the County Line barbecue team will resume their popular “Pitmaster Cooking Classes” on Nov. 9 at the restaurant, 10101 I-10 W.

There’s not a cooking class in all of San Antonio quite as fun as the Pitmaster Cooking Classes, and this one promised to be no exception.

Class participants will enjoy a full serving of each of the three courses as Stephens demonstrates how to prepare each dish while taking questions from the guests.

Everyone receives a recipe book, with space to take notes.

A cocktail reception featuring Alexander Valley Vineyards’ dry Rosé of Sangiovese begins at 7 p.m. with the class/dinner following at 7:30 p.m.

Pomegranate Glazed Carrots with Basil, Mint and Pine Nuts

The theme for the November menu is “Thanksgiving on the Grill” and includes:

  • Spinach Salad with Bosc Pears, Cranberries, Red Onion, Smoked Gouda and Candied Walnuts
  • Lemon Salt-Rubbed Smoked Turkey with Oregano and Thyme as well as Cranberry, Fig and Pinot Noir Chutney; Grilled Sourdough Dressing with Sausage, Parsnip, Apple and Sage; Pit Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Bleu Cheese, Arugula and Smoked Pecans; and Pomegranate-Glazed Carrots with Basil, Mint and Pine Nuts.
  • Smoked Pecan Pie with Jack Daniels and Grilled Peaches

Wine pairing for each course with wines from Alexander Valley Vineyards.

Pit Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Bleu Cheese, Arugula and Smoked Pecans

Since the grill will be fired up, the cooking class will be held outside on the restaurant’s shaded patio; in case of rain, the class will be moved inside.

The cost for this live cooking demonstration, recipe book, cocktail reception and three-course dinner is $50 per person plus tax and tip.

To make a reservation, contact the restaurant at (210) 641-1998 or garretts@countyline.com.

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The Pitmaster Knows: Disasters Can Happen in the Kitchen


By Garrett Stephens

Garrett Stephens

So, after the RSVPs were tallied, everyone begins to show up. The house is spotless with every detail paid the attention it deserves. The bar is stocked with an array of praise-worthy libations. And you’ve labored for weeks over the perfect menu to wow your friends and family. After many hours of toiling in the kitchen and investing your heart and soul into your craft, you carve into your piece de resistance and … you start screaming to yourself, “Oh, @#$%! I can’t serve this disaster of a meal!”

Now, add the fact that you are demonstrating to your guests how expertly this meal was prepared so that they may repeat your deft skills for their friends and family and you now are experiencing the nightmare situation that I found myself in minutes before a recent County Line Pitmaster Cooking Series, which was supposed to have featured whole pit-smoked hog in a Cuban Mojo.

As I was slicing big, beautiful hunks of slow-roasted pork off from the perfectly caramel-colored and smoke-scented beast, I naturally tasted my efforts, only to discover that the quality of meat that I had put so much trust and responsibility into was nowhere near what it needed to be — and it was nearly time for the class to begin. This was not even close to the many pigs we had slow-smoked in the past, and far below our best effort. What in the world do I do now? Tickets to the class had been sold, guests were due to arrive any minute, and the most important dish on the table was not worthy of my name, our reputation, and most importantly, not worthy of our guests.

The roast pig may have looked great, but it did not taste good enough to serve.

Well, after a tirade worthy of a TV reality kitchen show, a few tears and a subsequent trip to the bar, I did what any self-respecting cook/host should do: I threw that mealy old pig against the wall and kicked the apple right out of its mouth. The last thing I would ever do is put my name or the County Line name behind an effort that’s beneath us. After composing myself (and, of course, refunding all the tickets while putting out a wonderful spread of barbecue for those who did show on the house), I approached my guests. I explained what happened, we laughed over a cold one, and I could feel the genuine understanding and appreciation for they had for me. (OK, it may have been pity, but they were nice enough not to let it show.)

With enough attempts at the perfect culinary evening, we are all bound to have the proverbial rug pulled out from under our feet at some point. I think it’s important to realize that a disaster in the kitchen is not as bad as it may seem. Though my initial reaction to the pig disaster ran the gamut from embarrassment to anger, I knew that I had not made the fatal mistake of serving that course. Reputation still intact, we went on to have a great night of food and drink, even though it was not what we thought it would be. I guess I learned first-hand why we have our Emergency Kits of barbecue.

Garrett Stephens is the assistant general manager and pitmaster of The County Line, 10101 I-10 W.  Click here for information on upcoming events, including more Pitmaster Classes, at the restaurant.

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Cooking Classes Get Two Area Barbecue Joints All Fired Up


Texas Pride Barbecue is bringing back the Friday Fish Fry starting March 2.

Texas Pride Barbecue, 2980 E. Loop 1604, Adkins, will start its regular fish fries back up on March 2.

The weekly event includes fried pollock or shrimp with hush puppies, fries and more (or you can order barbecue inside and bring it around back). Live music, room for dancing and bucket of longnecks all help make the evening pass in a most agreeable manner.

There’s no cover charge, just plenty of fun.

The restaurant is also going to start up cooking classes in mid-April.

For more information, call (210) 649-3730 or click here.

Meanwhile, Garrett Stephens will resume his popular Pitmaster Cooking Class on March 30 at the County Line, 10101 I-10 W.

Garrett Stephens

Class participants will receive a full serving of each of the three courses as Stephens demonstrates how to prepare each dish and takes questions from the guests as he cooks. Everyone receives a recipe book, with space to take notes.

A cocktail reception featuring frozen mojitos made with Steve’s Frozen Chillers and Cruzan Light Rum, both of which are sponsors, begins at 7 p.m.; the class/dinner begins at 7:30 p.m.

The theme for the March 30 menu is “Pigging Out Cuban Style” and includes:

  • Cuban chopped salad with sour orange vinaigrette featuring smoked pork belly with a mango-cilantro glaze
  • Slow-smoked whole suckling pig in Cuban Mojo served with Cuban black beans and rice
  • Grilled plantains with brown sugar coconut rum glaze, mango puree, and vanilla bean ice cream

Since the grill will be fired up, the cooking class will be held outside on the restaurant’s shaded patio; in case of rain, the class will be moved inside.

The cost for the evening, including meal, class and cocktails, is $50 a person.  To make a reservation, call (210) 641-1998 or email  garretts@countyline.com.

 

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Rather Sweet to Become Sugar and Smoke; Auden’s Kitchen Updates Menu


Sugar and Smoke to open in Fredericksburg

Rebecca Rather

The Pastry Queen, Rebecca Rather, is planning a new restaurant. Her original place, Rather Sweet, has been closed for renovations and will reopen in January as Sugar and Smoke.

She will be teaming up with award-winning Wagyu brisket and steak chef Nicole Davenport on the venture.  “Our mission at Sugar & Smoke is to create dishes sourcing fresh, locally grown products that represent the best Texas flavors and styles!” the website says.

Nicole Davenport

Breakfast foods will include quiche, French toast and omelets, while lunch will bring a half-smoked chicken, pork-stuffed loin and pecan-smoked brisket.

The dessert list will include  pocket-sized key lime pies, tuxedo cake, Italian cream cake, hot chocolate cake, red velvet cupcakes, Big Haired Lemon Tarts, Garrison Bourbon apple pies and tiramisú.

Sugar & Smoke will also serve all of your favorite Beer and Wines as well as a selection of grab and go lunches including wraps, chicken salad, chips, and drinks.

The bakery/cafe will be open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday with a Sunday Brunch each week from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

For more information visit www.sugarandsmoke.com.

New items at Auden’s Kitchen

In time for fall: Tomato Chipotle Goat Cheese Soup at Auden's Kitchen.

Auden’s Kitchen, 700 E. Sonterra Blvd., has introduced a new menu for the fall and winter seasons.

Tamarind-glazed quail with an Asian sesame slaw, mussels steamed with a local brew and served with fries, garlicky white bean dip with flat bread, and tomato chipotle goat cheese soup are among the small plates on the menu. Large plates include pan-seared salmon with feta polenta cake, Texas antelope and quail, and a seasonal ravioli.

Happy hour is from 3 to 7 p.m. daily with a new bar/patio menu. Snacks start at $4, while house cocktails are $5 and select wines and beers are $4.

For more information call (210) 494-0070 or click here.

Celebrate a new Texas bourbon

.36 Texas Bourbon Whiskey

Ranger Creek Brewing & Distilling, 4834 Whirlwind Drive, is celebrating the release of .36 Texas Bourbon Whiskey with a launch party from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 26, just after Thanksgiving.

The event will featuring food from Lüke, 125 E. Houston St., including cochon du lait jambalaya, house-made sausages, Ranger Creek OPA-fried chicken, traditional Southern sides and bourbon pecan pie.

You can meet the distiller and have your bottle signed.

The cost is $60 a person, plus tax and gratuity. To make your prepaid reservation, call 210-227-LUKE or email jsoloman@chefjohnbesh.com.

Dady, Rather part of Pyles’ Celebrity Chef Dinner

Jason Dady

Lodge Restaurant of Castle Hills chef Jason Dady and Rebecca Rather are among the six chefs who’ll be part of the lineup for the 12th annual Stephan Pyles Celebrity Chef Dinner & Live Wine Auction, which is set for Dec. 4 at Pyles’ flagship restaurant in Dallas.

The event, presented under the auspices of the Wine & Food Foundation of Texas, raises money for the Stephan Pyles Culinary Scholarship.

Pyles will be cooking as well as Renee Morgan from Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Austin, who was the 2011 scholarship winner, David Garrido of Garrido’s in Austin and Nick Badovinus of Neighborhood Services Bar & Grill in Dallas. this is the second time Dady has participated in the event.

A Champagne reception kicks off the evening at 6 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. Seating is limited and reservations are required. The price is $150 a person (tax and gratuity included). Reservations can be made by calling the Foundation at (512) 327-7555 or by visiting www.winefoodfoundation.org.

According to a press release about the dinner, “The Stephan Pyles Culinary Scholarship is based upon an “Iron-Chef”-style cook-off each spring. Numerous students apply from across the state, and the top three applicants are selected for the challenge; the students must create a three-course menu utilizing a predetermined list of Texas ingredients.”

County Line class canceled

The County Line, 10101 I-10 W., has canceled its November cooking class. The class, which was set for this Friday, was too close to Thanksgiving for so many of the regulars, pitmaster Garrett Stephens said.

We’ll announce the next class as soon as it is scheduled.

 

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Sausage, Cheese and Garlic Shine in Grilled Chorizo-stuffed Mushrooms


Grilled Chorizo-stuffed Mushrooms

Grilling mushrooms filled with chorizo, garlic and more makes for an easy appetizer. And this recipe, from Garrett Stephens of the County Line, comes topped with Manchego cheese for an extra rich layer of flavor.

Stephens served these beauties with a Shiner Blond, one of our favorite summer time brews.

Stephens will be cooking up more such treats at his latest Pitmaster Class at the County Line, 10101 I-10 W., this Friday evening. For more information, call 210-641-1998 to see if any seats are left.

Grilled Chorizo-stuffed Mushrooms

16 large white mushrooms, stemmed, caps clean with dampened towel
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 pound Mexican or Spanish chorizo, depending on your taste
¾ cup finely diced onions
4 cloves minced garlic
½ cup bread crumbs
¼ cup chopped flat leaf parsley
2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
½ cup Manchego cheese
½ lemon, juiced
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste

Generously brush the mushrooms with olive oil and place on vegetable grill grate.

Sauté the onions 1-2 minutes until they begin to sweat.  Add garlic and cook 1-2 more minutes.  Add the chorizo and cook through.  Drain excess oil from chorizo mixture and transfer to a bowl.  Add the breadcrumbs, herbs, and lemon juice.  Season mixture to taste with salt and pepper.

Stuff the mushrooms with mixture and top with a little cheese.

Set a grill up for indirect grilling.  Place mushrooms on vegetable grate set on away from heat.  Cover grill.  Cook the mushrooms until tender and nicely browned, about 15-20 minutes.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

From Garrett Stephens, the County Line.

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Restaurant Notes & Quotes: Gallo Pizzeria Opens; Wine Tasting at Texas de Brazil; and More


Gallo spices up the San Antonio pizza scene

Gallo Pizzeria has opened at 164 Castroville Road.

The restaurant specializes in hot and spicy pizzas as well as wings. Prices range from $10.95 for a medium and $12.95 for a large. That is, except for the Diablo, a specialty pizza with diced habanero, jalapeños and ghost peppers with the house diablo sauce. It is priced at $3.95 for a small, $9.95 for a medium and $19.95 for a large.

Other specialty pizzas include the Veggie Delight (mushrooms, onions, spinach, bell pepper and olives), the Chanchi Pizza (avocado chunks, black olives, and red onions on a spicy bean sauce),  the Gallo Pizza (chicken, spinach, and sliced tomatoes with Salsa Mexicana sauce), the Mexican Margarita (fresh tomatoes garnished with dried basil served on Salsa Italiano).

It is open from noon to 8 p.m. Monday-Saturday.

For more information, call 210-264-0077 or click here.

Texas de Brazil is hosting a private label wine tasting.

Private label wine tasting at Texas de Brazil

Texas de Brazil, 313 E. Houston St., is hosting a private label wine tasting at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 23.

Though the label may be private, here are the pairings for the evening: Chardonnay matched with chicken breast wrapped in bacon and smoked salmon crostini with creme fraiche; Merlot with goat cheese crostini with asparagus, garlic picanha and Brazilian sausage; and Cabernet Sauvignon with flank steak with chimichurri and Parmesan pork.

The cost is $25 a person, including tax and tip. For reservations, call 210-229-1600 or email dainaandelmo@texasdebrazil.com.

La Mansión’s new cocktail list has a regional kick

El Colegio, the bar at the Omni La Mansión del Rio, 112 College St., has revamped its cocktail list with help from mixologists from across the country.

The lineup includes a host of new drinks made with local ingredients and featuring regional flavors. A few include the following:

  • Smokin’ Patrón — Patrón Silver Tequila shaken with hand-squeezed lime juice, Monin Agave Nectar and a splash of Del Maguey Mezcal.
  • Prickly Sangria Punch — Bacardi Limón Rum, prickly pear purée, fresh lemon juice, Monin Agave Nectar, topped off with ginger ale.
  • Grand Ole Margarita – Herradura Silver Tequila, Monin Agave Nectar, fresh lime and orange juices topped with a float of Grand Marnier.

For more information, call 210-518-1000.

It’s Back to the Pit at County Line

Blueberry-Pecan Crumble Pie is on the menu at the next County Line Pitmaster Cooking Class.

The County Line at 10101 I-10 W. is resuming its popular Pitmaster Cooking Classes with chef Garrett Stephens on the first Fridays of the month. The next two classes are scheduled for Sept. 9 and Oct. 7. Both begin at 7 p.m.

Class participants will enjoy a full serving of each of the four courses that Stephens demonstrates. He also takes questions from the guests while he cooks in an evening that is keeps everyone entertained. A recipe book with room for notes is also included.

The Sept. 9 menu will feature: Bacon-Wrapped Grilled Quail with a Maker’s Mark Jalapeño Glaze; Pit-fired Summer Vegetables with Fresh Basil and Balsamic; Herb-crusted Smoked Prime Rib with Creamed Horseradish and Lemon-Thyme Campfire Potatoes; and Blueberry-Pecan Crumble Pie with Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream.

LangeTwins Wines will be paired with each course.

Since the grill will be fired up, the cooking class will be held outside on the restaurant’s shaded patio; in case of rain, the class will be moved inside.

The cost for the evening with wines included is $50 a person plus tax and tip. Call 210-641-1998 or email garretts@countyline.com. The last two Pitmaster Classes have sold out a week before the event, so make your reservations now.

Labor Day specials at Roaring Fork, Wildfish

Wildfish Seafood Grille (above) and Roaring Fork are offering a savory Labor Day special.

Roaring Fork, 1806 N. Loop 1604 W., and its sister restaurant next door, Wildfish Seafood Grille, are dishing up some specials for Labor Day.

Buy one entrée and get a second entrée free during dinner, which begins at 4 p.m. at Roaring Fork and 5 p.m. at Wildfish. The dishes can be purchased in the dining room or bar. The complimentary entrée must be of equal or lesser-value.

For reservations at Roaring Fork, call 210-479-9700 or visit www.roaringfork.com. To reach Wildfish, call 210-493-1600 or visit www.eddiev.com.

If you have restaurant news, email walker@savorsa.com or griffin@savorsa.com.

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Get Maximum Flavor from Your Grill


Have your plan ready before starting, Garrett Stephens advises.

Are you going to grill this weekend? You’re not alone. Folks across the country will be lighting up charcoal or warming their propane grills for cookouts featuring everything from steaks and hamburgers to veggie skewers and portobello mushrooms.

But as much as Americans love to grill, not everybody gets the best results. So, to help you out, we asked three grill masters in town to offer five tips for better grilling. The answers are mostly varied and the advice is certainly sound, but we must point out two tips that did come more than once and should be taken to heart:

Don’t over-season the meat; that is, if it’s the meat you want to taste. And practice a little patience: Let the meat rest a few minutes before you cut into it; it’ll be juicier and taste a whole lot better.

Garrett Stephens, pitmaster at the County Line Barbecue, 10101 I-10 W., offers the following tips for after you’ve dusted  off the grill:

  1. Have a game plan in order to wow your friends and family with the perfect outdoor feast. To start, take a quick inventory of what meats will be gracing your plate. You will need to set your grill up accordingly. For burgers, dogs, kabobs, fish, and thin cut steaks you will want to set your grill up for direct heat, and leaving 4-6 inches from your coals. For thicker cuts, such as roasts, whole chickens, ribs, and thick cut steaks you will want to have a part of your grill set up to accommodate an indirect method so that you wont end up charring your heartier cuts and leaving the middle underdone.
  2. Pat meat dry and wipe off excess marinades.

    Make sure you are adding the flavors that your grill was destined to create by adding rubs, marinades, and smoke. A proper marinade should consist of an acidic ingredient, such as vinegar, wine, or citrus juice; a little oil, such as olive; and various spices and herbs. Rubs generally consist of various spices, herbs, and even citrus zests ranging from sweet to savory. Rubs will not only tenderize cuts of beef, but will add deep, wonderful flavor. Rubs should be applied several hours prior to grilling and the meats left in a refrigerator.

  3. Be sure to thoroughly wipe off excess marinade before you grill in order to prevent flame from flaring up.
  4. While grilling, be sure to add wood chips to your coals just before you throw on your cuts. Experiment with different types of woods to obtain smoky flavors ranging from delicate to earthy, and aromatic to sweet.
  5. Finally, as you pull off your pieces of culinary genius, take a moment, 5- 10 minutes, to let your works rest. If you cut in too quickly, the juices will run out all over your plate instead of in your mouth, which is where they should be. If you let the meat, rest the juices will permeate the meat and the final product will be the perfect compliment to your Fourth of July picnic.

Select the right wine to go with the meat you're grilling, Troy Knapp says.

Troy Knapp, executive chef at the Hyatt Hill Country, 9800 Hyatt Resort Drive, is also a certified sommelier. So naturally, pairing what you grill with the right drink is important:

  1. Quality — Purchase the best you can afford. All-natural beef is better for you and the environment. When it comes to meat, you generally get what you pay for. You are better of going with a smaller piece if you are looking to save. Think quality over quantity and you will be much more satisfied in the long run. Simple seasoning is the best way to enhance a great cut of meat. Use great quality olive oil, sea salt and fresh ground pepper.
  2. Tempering — For an evenly cooked steak, allow your steak (or other protein) to acclimate to room temperature before putting it on the grill. This should take approximately one hour on your kitchen counter and be sure to cover.
  3. Resting — A crucial step that allows the juices to integrate properly and ultimately provide a juicier finished product. Once removed from the grill, simply let the steaks rest for approximately 7 to 8 minutes before cutting into them.
  4. Wine — Steaks with higher fat content such as a rib-eye or New York strip will benefit from a big wine with significant tannin such as a Syrah, Zinfandel or Cabernet Sauvignon. Lean meats such as tenderloin pair much nicer with lower tannin reds such as Merlot or Pinot Noir. Don’t forget about dry rosé for grilled fish and chicken. Make sure you slightly chill the reds by placing in the refrigerator for a half hour to achieve a temperature of approximately 60 degrees.
  5. Sides — Refreshing sides are a nice accent to rich barbecued, grilled or smoked meats. Instead of creamy potato salad or coleslaw, go with a roasted potato salad with vinaigrette and herbs or a vinaigrette slaw. Add accompaniments such as chimichurri or pickled vegetables. Items with good acidity will add a light fresh component and will surely excite the palate.

Salt and pepper are all you need to season that steak, Jason Dady says.

Jason Dady, whose restaurants include the Lodge Restaurant of Castle Hills, Bin 555 and Tre Trattoria and feature a grill or two, offers the following tips:

  1. The best results come from a hot grill. Too many people use coals that are too cool or a gas grill that has not gotten hot enough
  2. Don’t use too much oil. It aids in flames, which can cause the extra carbon bitterness in the food. Use the least amount of oil.
  3. Rub the grill with a lightly oiled rag prior to grilling while coals and grates are hot. It will act as a natural “non-stick.”
  4. Pat all meats dry prior to cooking. They should not be wet. It will help in allowing the caramelization of the meat to get a richer, darker flavor profile.
  5. Salt and pepper — it’s all you need. Kosher salt to season with and fresh cracked black pepper. Let your steak taste like your steak!

 

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Learn How to Whip Up a Taste of New Orleans


Grilled Oysters Rockefeller

Now that the weather’s warmer, it’s time to return your attention to the grill. In that spirit, the County Line, 10101 I-10 W., resumes its monthly Pitmaster Cooking Class at 7 p.m. March 25.

The March theme is “A Taste of New Orleans” and will feature chef Garrett Stephens presenting a multi-course dinner inspired by the Big Easy.

Guests will be able to dine on full servings of the each of the four courses, while Stephens demonstrates how each of the dishes is prepared. All of the recipes are in a souvenir cookbook with plenty of room for taking notes.

Creole-grilled Mirliton Ratatouille

The evening begins at 7 p.m. with Hurricane cocktails, followed by the class at 7:30 featuring the following menu:

  • Grilled Oysters Rockefeller with Crispy Pancetta and Gruyère
  • Creole-grilled Mirliton Ratatouille
  • Nawlins’ Style BBQ Shrimp
  • Bananas Foster with County Line Vanilla Bean Ice Cream

The cost for the evening is $50 a person plus tax and tip. To make a reservation, call 210-641-1998 or e-mail garretts@countyline.com. (The last two classes have sold out a week before the event, so you may want to plan ahead.)

The next class after that will be April 29.

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Grilled Cornbread Dressing with Sweet Sausage


Grilled Cornbead Dressing with Sweet Sausage

Fire up the grill to make your next bowl of dressing.

Grilled Cornbread Dressing with Sweet Sausage

12 ounces mild (usually labeled ‘sweet’) Italian sausage
2 large red bell peppers
6 large cornbread muffins
2 tablespoons butter
2 onions, chopped
A handful of fresh sage leaves, chopped
Salt, to taste
Pepper, to taste
1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped
1 egg
1/3 cup heavy cream
1/3 cup chicken stock or vegetable stock

Set up grill for direct grill method. Add soaked wood chips to the fire.

Grill sausage over direct heat until it reaches an internal temperature of 180 degrees. Cut into thin slices, and set aside.

Roast peppers over direct heat until completely charred and skins blister. Place in a bowl and cover. Set aside for 10 minutes, then chop.

Grill cornbread muffins on all sides until lightly charred. Crumble and set aside.

Melt butter over medium heat in a medium sauce pan. Add the onions and cook, stirring for about 10 minutes or until soft and caramelized.

In a large mixing bowl, add crumbled cornbread, sage, chopped peppers, thinly sliced grilled sausage, and caramelized onion and combine well. Add salt and pepper to taste.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg, cream and chicken stock. Pour mixture over the cornbread. Stir dressing together, spoon into buttered baking dish and bake 20 to 25 minutes at 300 degrees.

Garnish with chopped parsley.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

From Garrett Stephens/The County Line

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