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Show Your Love with a Slice of Homemade Pie

Show Your Love with a Slice of Homemade Pie

A homemade pie is a sure sign of love to many. And who can resist the light fluffy custard in a buttermilk pie? This version, from “Cambridge Cooks,” a cookbook to benefit Cambridge Elementary School in Alamo Heights, comes together easily. Just remember to beat a lot of air into the eggs, and remove it from the oven when the top is a golden brown. Serve it with the garnish of your choice, from a mint sprig to macerated berries to a drizzle of chocolate syrup.

Buttermilk Cafe buttermilk pieButtermilk Pie

3 eggs
1/2 cup butter, melted and cooled
1/2 cup buttermilk
2 teaspoon flour
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 (9-inch) deep dish pie crust, unbaked

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Beat eggs in a large bowl. Add butter, buttermilk, flour, sugar and vanilla. Stir until all the ingredients are combined. Pour into pie crust.

Bake for 35-45 minutes.

From Ann Buehler/”Cambridge Cooks”

Posted in Cookbooks, Featured, Recipes0 Comments

Enjoy a Fireside by the Fire’s Side

Enjoy a Fireside by the Fire’s Side

It hasn’t been too cold this winter, but that hasn’t prevented people from building a fire in their fireplace and heating up some fine drinks to enjoy while the long night passes. Here’s a recipe from Facundo Eximo, a dark aged rum, for a Fireside, a cocktail that features ingredients most of us have on hand. I might also add a little whipped cream to the top, because, well, it’s whipped cream.

The Facundo Fireside

The Facundo Fireside

Facundo Fireside

2 parts Facundo Eximo or other dark aged rum
1 strip lemon peel
1 cinnamon stick
1 strip orange peel
3 coffee beans
1 part simple syrup
3 parts coffee

In a shallow pan, add rum, lemon peel, cinnamon stick, orange peel, coffee beans and simple syrup. Set the combination on fire and allow to burn for 3 minutes. Extinguish the flame by adding the coffee and strain into a mug. Garnish with the cinnamon stick, if desired.

 

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When Life Hands You Stale Doughnuts …

When Life Hands You Stale Doughnuts …

Use kitchen shears to cut up stale doughnuts easily.

Use kitchen shears to cut up stale doughnuts easily.

Someone at work brought in doughnuts this week, and at the end of the day, there were more than a half-dozen left untouched. (I must not work with Lutherans, because doughnuts don’t last long at my church on Sundays.)

Anyway, they were just too good to go to waste, so I gathered them up and took them home with me, so I could make bread pudding with them, using a recipe that SavorSA had run in the past.

Doughnut Bread Pudding

Enjoy this easy recipe from our archives.

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Waking Up to Cowboys, Tacos, Biscuits and Coffee

Waking Up to Cowboys, Tacos, Biscuits and Coffee

The 38th annual Cowboy Breakfast is already known as the largest free breakfast in the world. But the organizers, under the sponsorship of Jordan Ford, wanted something more this year.

Shoveling the coals

Shoveling the coals

They wanted the event with the most tacos served at one time.

So, the booth volunteers were working overtime Friday morning to get tacos into the hands of the tens of thousands who showed up despite temperatures in the 30s before the sun rose. (Rain, sleet and who knows what all else Mother Nature dishes up won’t keep people from the Cowboy Breakfast, so you can bet a frigid little breeze was no problem.)

According to organizers, the following was going to be served:

–34,000 Mission Foods tortillas

–10,000 Kiolbassa sausage and eggs tacos

–6,000 Kiolbassa chorizo and egg tacos

–2,500 servings of Pioneer Biscuits and Gravy

–8,000 Pioneer biscuits and Kiolbassa Sausage

–10,000 Rudy’s BBQ beef tacos

–10,000 Delicious tamales

–8,000 Mrs. Bairds sweet rolls

–5,000 pints of Oak Farms milk and juice

–15,000 cups of McDonald’s special roast coffee

Also on the menu were plenty of smiles, despite the workload, and an extra dose of goodwill.

The Cowboy Breakfast is also the unofficial start of the rodeo season in San Antonio. The San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo gets underway Feb. 11.

Spooning filling into tacos

Spooning filling into tacos

Waiting in line

Waiting in line

Serving up biscuits and gravy

Serving up biscuits and gravy

Warming the tortillas

Warming the tortillas

Who needs coffee?

Who needs coffee?

Prepping the sausage

Prepping the sausage

For many, it's a family outing

For many, it’s a family outing

Posted in Featured, Video0 Comments

Let’s Raise a Glass to Jay Corley

Let’s Raise a Glass to Jay Corley

Word reached me late last week that the California wine world had lost one of its pioneers earlier this month. Jay Corley of Monticello Vineyards in the Napa Valley died on Jan. 11 at the age of 84.

Jay Corley (http://www.corleyfamilynapavalley.com/)

Jay Corley (http://www.corleyfamilynapavalley.com/)

Folks in town who frequent wine dinners at various restaurants may remember Corley, who came to town to promote his wines. Over a bottle or two of his Cabernets and Merlots, he formed lasting friendships with more than a few locals who treasure the time they spent with him as well as his wines.

I first met Corley at one of those dinners. It was at Las Canarias, and he was surrounded by friends old and new. During his talk, he was quick to issue invitations for one and all to come see his winery. That was all I needed to seek it out on my first visit to California. Having some sort of connection always helps when you have a seemingly unlimited array of choices, and there are hundreds of wineries in Napa.

Corley’s Napa Valley winery is indeed modeled after its namesake, Thomas Jefferson’s home. More than being beautiful, it proved to be a haven of peace in the wine-tourist crazed area. While walking around the place, I was able to enjoy the sounds of nature on an overcast afternoon and take in its agricultural beauty. It was here that I really came to understand that for as elevated a treat as wine is, it is the product of farming.

The tasting room was having a sale that day, and I remember sending a case of older Pinot Noirs and Cabernet Francs back to San Antonio to grace several holiday meals after that.

I next encountered Jay Corley in New Mexico, where he was attending the Santa Fe Wine and Chile Fiesta. I was traveling with friends Mickey and Glenn Drown, who are among the friends Corley had made over the years. Jay and his wife, Joan, had an annual party that the Drowns and the others in our group had attended for years. Once there, everyone seemed to fall back into each others’ company as if they had seem each other the previous week. Jay was especially proud that year of his Syrah, which showed off the best that his estate could produce and which was a grape that he had managed to continue to produce despite public tastes at the time.

monticelloDuring the evening, Corley mentioned to Glenn that he wouldn’t be able to make an exclusive tasting that had been set up for the governor’s mansion on the following day. He gave the tickets to Glenn, who invited me to accompany him. (It was there I met Douglas Murray, who invited me to visit his winery, Montes, in Chile. But my trip to his winery is another story.)

The day after the tasting, we went to a Corley wine dinner, which, if I recall correctly, was somewhere on the compound of the Museum of International Folk Art. During the winery owner’s presentation, he handed out several gifts. As my birthday was the following day, I received a gift of a DVD about Jefferson and the pioneering work he did with wine in this country. Corley was a part of the documentary and he was in his element, talking both about his hero and about winemaking. I treasure that gift more now than ever.

I have been holding on to a bottle of Monticello Vineyards Pinot Noir for a few years. What better way can I honor Jay Corley’s life than by lifting a glass of one of his finest to his memory? Join me.

 

Posted in Drinks, Featured, Griffin to Go0 Comments

Let Your Team Spirits Soar

Let Your Team Spirits Soar

Want to party and show some support for your favorite team at the same time? Here’s a cocktail from Dulce Vida Tequila and Strong Tonic that lets you do just that. The Texas tequila maker poured this at the opening of the 2016 San Antonio Cocktail Conference.

Dulce Vida Tequila offers the San Antonio Spur

Dulce Vida Tequila offers the San Antonio Spur

1.5 ounces Dulce Vida Blanco Tequila
.25 ounce Dulce Vida Agave Nectar
.25 ounces Original Strong Tonic Syrup
.5 ounce lemon juice
3 raspberries
1 basil leaf
3 ounces Ginger Strong Tonic

Muddle the raspberries and basil leaf in a shaker. Add ice and pour in the tequila, agave nectar, tonic syrup and lemon juice. Shake. Strain into a cup filled with ice. Add Ginger Strong Tonic.

Garnish with a lemon peel (“thick twist” about 2-3 times the width of a twist).

Makes 1 cocktail.

From Strong Tonic and Dulce Vida Tequila

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It’s Time to Drink Up for a Good Cause

It’s Time to Drink Up for a Good Cause

Though a few potent potables have been served up throughout the week across town, the 2016 San Antonio Cocktail Conference officially got underway Thursday with a party at the Majestic Theater that stretched from the recesses of the stage to the balcony overlooking Houston Street.

San Antonio's Cinco Vodka serves Amore Fizzante.

San Antonio’s Cinco Vodka serves Amore Fizzante.

Partygoers could stroll from to booth, sampling cocktails made with everything from aged rye to organic tequila or filling up on goodies that included mole negro from Mixtli and Frito pie from the Esquire.

In short, it was yet another reason for San Antonio to have a party — and party they did.

The lines were as lengthy for the Cookhouse’s smoked duck as they were for Texas Revenge Gin’s lively variation of a Moscow Mule. Dulce Vida Blanco Tequila shook up their original recipe for a San Antonio Spur while Jason Dady and his Shuck Shack crew served up hundreds of oysters for three hours.

This year, food seemed to play an equal role alongside the cocktails. So, you could sample a Negroni variation made with Aperol alongside pickled shrimp from the Art Institute’s culinary school. Or you could have locally distilled Cinco Vodka’s Amore Frizzante with Processco and raspberries paired with rich confections from Choicolate.

Italian amari, or bitter herbal liqueurs, were a popular ingredient in cocktails, whether you wanted to try Amaro Nonino, Aperol, Averna, Fernet Branca, you name it.

Colorful canapes from Austin's La Condesa.

Colorful canapes from Austin’s La Condesa.

Not all of these beauties were complex concoctions that required a mixology degree, either. The winning Redemption Rye mixed equal parts of its rye with Amaro Montenegron to create the Montes Redemption, which was finished off with a lemon peel. That’s it.

Many more refreshments will be served throughout the rest of the conference, which runs through Sunday. Click here for details. And remember to drink and drive responsibly.

All proceeds from the conference will benefit local children’s charities, including The Children’s Shelter, ChildSafe, Clarity Child Guidance Center, TEAMability and Transplants for Children.

Mixtli serves up tacos with negro mole.

Mixtli serves up tacos with negro mole.

Crowds throng the Majestic for the SACC opening.

Crowds throng the Majestic for the SACC opening.

The Cookhouse serves up smoked duck on the stage of the Majestic.

The Cookhouse serves up smoked duck on the stage of the Majestic.

Texas Revenge Gin shakes up a lively variation on the Moscow Mule.

Texas Revenge Gin shakes up a lively variation on the Moscow Mule.

Luis Colon of FOLC makes tuna poke.

Luis Colon of FOLC makes tuna poke.

An attractive assortment from Choicolate.

An attractive assortment from Choicolate.

Jason Dady and the Shuck Shack crew offer oysters.

Jason Dady and the Shuck Shack crew offer oysters.

Posted in Drinks0 Comments

Shake It, Baby! The Cocktail Conference Returns

Shake It, Baby! The Cocktail Conference Returns

The San Antonio Cocktail Conference returns Jan. 14-17, but the fun isn’t contained to those days.

An Irish Manhattan

An Irish Manhattan

The real fun begins Jan. 9 with dinners at Luke and the Shuck Shack and continue on until the big opening night party at the Majestic as well as a toast to Sasha Petraske, the late cocktail expert who was one of the founders of the conference.

For the following few days, you can attend parties, dinners and seminars that include such topics as “How to Bartend Like a Jedi,” “I’ll Take Potent Presidential Potables for $500, Alex” and, for Gregg Popovich among others, “Madeira Understood.”

If you want to check out the full schedule, click here.

In the meantime, here are a couple of variations on classic cocktails to get you started in the right spirit. And remember: Enjoy your drinks responsibly.

Corpse Reviver

Corpse Reviver

Corpse Reviver

1 part Hendrick’s Gin
1 part Cointreau
1 part Lillet
1 part lemon juice
Dash of absinthe

Combine all ingredients in cocktail shaker and shake briskly over cubed ice. Double strain into cocktail glass.

Makes 1 cocktail.

From Hendrick’s Gin

An Irish Manhattan

1 shot (about 1.7 ounces) Tullamore D.E.W. Original Irish whiskey
1 tablespoon sweet vermouth.
1 teaspoon Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur
Dashes of Angostura Bitters, to taste
Dashes of orange bitters, to taste
Orange twist
1 maraschino cherry.

Stir Irish whiskey, sweet vermouth, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur and dashes of Angostura and Orange Bitters together quickly over ice.

Pour into a chilled coupette glass. Zest an orange twist over the surface of drink, spiral and drop in to the glass.

Garnish with maraschino cherry.

Makes 1 cocktail.

From Tullamore D.E.W. Original

 

 

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George Washington Knew a Good Eggnog When He Tasted It

George Washington Knew a Good Eggnog When He Tasted It

eggnog1I cannot tell a lie: George Washington’s eggnog recipe is a winner.

I found this recipe in a colorful tome called “Christmas in Colonial and Early America” published by the World Book Encyclopedia back in 1975.

I don’t really know if it’s really Washington’s recipe, but the authors declare it to be: “This potent holiday drink was a favorite of the general’s. It is made in Virginia to this day, in exactly the same proportions.”

Why quibble, when the first direction is the poetically phrased: “Combine liquor.”

There’s no mention of nutmeg, which was a rarity in the colonies and early days of America. Shave some fresh nutmeg on top of each serving to taste, if you like.

You need to make this festive punch in advance in order to let the flavors blend.

George Washington’s Eggnog

1 pint brandy
1/2 pint rye whiskey
4 ounces sherry
4 ounces rum
12 eggs, separated
3/4 cup sugar
1 quart milk
1 quart heavy cream

Combine liquor. Beat egg yolks in a large bowl until thick, then beat in sugar. Gradually add liquor, then milk and cream while continuing to beat. Beat egg whites to stiff, not dry, peaks; fold into liquid mixture. Cover and refrigerate for at least 5 days before serving.

Makes 3 three quarts.

From “Christmas in Colonial and Early America”

For a local take on eggnog, check out this version from Christopher Ware, who now has Paramour.

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The Best Place in SA to Shop for Someone Who Loves to Cook

The Best Place in SA to Shop for Someone Who Loves to Cook

At Rodriguez Butcher Supply, you can find the chef's knife that's right for you.

At Rodriguez Butcher Supply, you can find the chef’s knife that’s right for you.

If the cooks on your gift list have been very nice this year, you may want to return the favor and get some really nice gifts to thank them.

rod philip fickelYou don’t have to break the bank, either.

Not if you travel to Rodriguez Butcher Supply on the west side. The store at 1715 W. Commerce St. has been around for decades now, as you can tell from some of the historic photos that grace the walls. But in the recent past, the family has added a kitchen supply business that has attracted some of the top chefs in town. (Check out the store’s Facebook page, and you’ll find a banner featuring Robbie Nowlin, Jason Dady and Stefan Bowers, “rock stars” of the city’s culinary scene, says Philip Fickel, whose family has run the store for several generations.)

Everyone who loves chefs knives will be attracted to the dazzling along one wall of the store. From Wusthof and Henckels to Nora and even blades from Austin and San Antonio, you’ll find what you’re looking for and at a prices that I couldn’t quite believe. Ask Fickel for help in deciding what’s best for beginners or trained professionals, what works best for cutting sashimi or vegetables as well as beef, pork and boning fowl. There’s even an oyster shucker for smaller New England bivalves; it comes with a beer bottle opener as part of the blade.

Handcrafted knifes for all purposes are on sale.

Handcrafted knifes for all purposes are on sale.

You can also sign up for knife sharpening classes and get the tools to keep your blades’ edges cutting efficiently.

Don’t just stop for knives, however.  Rodriguez has plenty of other kitchen items, such as pots and pans as well as butcher equipment, including meat slicers, tenderizers, hooks and saws. Plus, if you want to stuff your own sausage, no matter whether you’re using venison, lobster or pork, you’ll find seasonings and cures as well as casings and stuffers.

And if you want to start cooking sous vide, you’ll find what you need there as well.

Check out some of the inventory at homebutcher.com. But don’t just shop this local business online. Go over to the store and let Fickel, his family or any of the staff help you out. You never know what you’re going to find.

A few of the knives at Rodriguez.

A few of the knives at Rodriguez.

This oyster shucker also opens your beer bottle.

This oyster shucker also opens your beer bottle.

 

 

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